Grrrr! Photography

North American Landscapes & Wildlife

Alberta Grizzly Bear

"THREATENED SPECIES" LESS THAN 500 LEFT IN THE WILD!!!!! The East Slope Alberta Grizzly bear is a rare sighting, but can be found along the Eastern Slopes and foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in Alberta. Recent numbers released by the Alberta Government have shown there are under 500 of these native grizzly bears left in our province. After a huge public outcry February 2006 the Alberta Government finally announced the Spring hunt would be suspended for 3 years. Right now, the absolute number one issue for Alberta's Grizzlies is habitat security. Grizzly bears will not survive in Alberta until serious measures are taken to reduce the enormous network of industrial roads which dissect prime grizzly bear habitat. In the foothills of the rockies, there are hundreds of logging and lease roads that are no longer in use by industry. These roads are fragmenting some of the best habitat that these bears rely on for their survival. These roads are now used by hunters, poachers and the general public. With the increase in human access, comes an increase of human-bear mortality and traffic related deaths. With the bears re-productive rates being very low it is impossible for them to sustain their population without our protection. Our bears are slowly dying and they need your help. A DNA based population estimate completed by the Foothills Model Forest, shows there are currently approximately 43 grizzlies found between Hwy 16 and Hwy 11, another 45 bears found between Hwy 11 and Hwy 1 and approximately 90 bears found between Hwy 1 and Hwy 3. Currently they have no final count on how many bears are North of Hwy 16 or South of Hwy 3, but they are estimating this number to be very low at the most 150 bears. The cause for such low numbers is that too many bears are dying, mainly due to loss of habitat caused by the oil & gas industry and forestry industry due to the building of roads through prime habitat which then allows access to the general public which in turn increases human-caused mortality, hunting and poaching and traffic related deaths. With the bears re-productive rates being very low it is impossible for them to sustain their population without protection. All profits from this gallery will be donated to the Alberta Wilderness Association for the conservation of these bears.
 
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